Collagen Builder

Our Vegan Collagen Builder is formulated with phytonutrients, micronutrients, and key amino-acids which are the building blocks of natural collagen production in our body. The product has been formulated to support the body’s natural collagen synthesis.

Key Benefits of Collagen

  • Helps in enhancing the body’s collagen synthesis process and increasing rate of collagen generation. 
  • Helps traps moisture and prevents dehydration of the dermis. 
  • Helps provide structure and strength to skin, hair & bones.
  • Helps provide tensile strength to tissues & allows joints to absorb shocks.
  • Helps in wound healing.
  • Helps slow down the aging process & improve elasticity of skin.
  • Helps reduce wrinkle formation & make the skin appear firm and smooth.
  • Formulated for all genders.
  • Vegan Collagen Builder – no hooves, no horns and no hides. 

 450.00 1,200.00

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Ingredients Per Serving

Synthesizers – 2749mg 

Amino Acid Blend (Glycine, L-Lysine HCL, L-Ornithine L-Aspartate), Vitamin C (As Ascorbic Acid), Elemental Copper (as Copper Gluconate) 

Plant-Based Protectors – 450mg 

Citrus Bioflavonoids (Standardized to 40% Hesperidin), Tagetes erecta (Standardized to 5% Lutein)

Maintenance & Hydration – 142mg 

Hyaluronic Acid as Na-glucuronate-N-acetylglucosamine from Streptococcus zooepidemicus Standardized to 95% Hyaluronic Acid, Organic Bamboo Extract Bambusa vulgaris Extract Standardized to 70% Silica 

Serving Size

One Sachet or One Scoop

Benefits

  • Helps enhance the level of collagen production.
  • Supports the body’s natural mechanism of collagen synthesis.
  • Protects the cells from free radical damage.
  • Contains Lutein which is a potent natural antioxidant carotenoid. 
  • Helps inactivate the enzymes that degrade collagen, thus increasing the rate of synthesis and decreasing the rate of degeneration. 
  • Helps protect collagen and maintains moisture levels in the dermis to make skin appear plum, hydrated, smoother & firm. 
  • Contains natural antioxidants which helps reduce UV-induced inflammation and wrinkle formation. 
  • Helps slow down the aging process & improve elasticity of skin. 
  • Helps reduce wrinkle formation & makes the skin appear firm and smooth. 
  • Helps provide structure and strength to skin, hair, nails & bones. 
  • Helps provide tensile strength to tissues & allows joints to absorb shocks. 
  • Helps in wound healing.

Product Description

Description

There are many plant based vegan collagen builder products in the market, which are packed with a lot of plant & fruit powders & extracts, and large amounts of biotin. These are not scientifically formulated, and lack the correct ingredients which are critical to the collagen synthesis process.

Unived’s Vegan Collagen Builder has the necessary essential and conditionally essential amino acids – glycine, lysine and ornithine, potent natural antioxidants & required vitamins – lutein, vitamin C, and minerals like sodium & copper, protective & hydrating ingredients like hesperidin, hyaluronic acid and organic bamboo extract.{

These ingredients work to enhance the body’s ability to naturally produce collagen, inhibit the enzymes that degrade collagen, prevent the cells from free radical damage, and ensure hydration.  

AMINO ACIDS

Glycine, proline and lysine play a special role in collagen structure and their insufficient availability could make collagen synthesis and regeneration difficult[i]. An increased concentration of glycine, proline or lysine promotes increase in collagen synthesis. All collagen proteins have a structure based on three helical polypeptide chains with glycine (Gly) occurring every three amino acid residues while proline (Pro) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) make up about 1/6 of the total sequence of collagen[ii].

Providing additional PRO (proline) in the diet to enhance PRO bioavailability for collagen biosynthesis does not result in increased collagen accumulation. In looking at other PRO biosynthetic pathways, the arginine (ARG) –> ornithine (ORN) –> glutamic semialdehyde –> PRO pathway looks the most promising.

  • Glycine must be considered an essential amino acid because the capacity of its synthesis is much lower than its actual need. This deficiency is not covered with a regular diet so glycine should be added to it as a nutritional supplement in high amounts[4].
  • Lysine is an essential amino acid, whose availability depends entirely on the diet[4].
  • Ornithine supplementation is the most effective in increasing collagen deposition. ORN, through the action of ORN g-aminotransferase, is converted to glutamic g-semialdehyde, the link to PRO synthesis[iii]. Proline is conditionally essential under some conditions, which means that the capacity of its synthesis could not sufficiently account for its need[4]. On the other hand, ORN being a strong pituitary secretagogues of growth hormone, may mediate positive effect on wound collagen deposition, increases wound breaking strength and collagen accumulation in iNOS-knockout mice to the same extent as in wild-type animals[6].

VITAMINS

  • Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid,
    • Enhances collagen synthesis[iv]. The cofactor function of ascorbate provides an apparent explanation for its role in regulation of collagen synthesis, i.e., modulation of secretion through prolyl hydroxylation.[v]
    • Vitamin C has an essential role in connective tissue healing[7].
    • It acts as a powerful antioxidant by neutralizing deleterious reactive oxygen species (ROS) (found in environmental pollutants and after exposure to ultraviolet radiation) during the inflammatory phase[7].
    • Vitamin C is only one player in the antioxidant arsenal that includes enzymatic defenses[vi].
    • It increases the resistance of the skin to UV exposure[9].
  • Lutein is found in human skin as a result of dietary intake. This xanthophyll has shown to help provide protection against skin damage caused by UV light and reduce the potential of UV light to suppress the immune functionality of the skin in animal studies[vii]. In both the skin and eyes, this carotenoid work as a filler to block damaging blue wavelengths and as antioxidants to prevent free radical damage.
    • Potent natural antioxidant: The amount of lipid peroxidation present in the skin was statistically significantly reduced within the first 2-week period and continued to decrease throughout the entire study period[10].
    • Improves skin parameter: In addition, the amount of moisture in the skin was increased as early as 2 weeks and continued to increase throughout the study. Within 12 weeks, the supplement significantly improved skin tone, luminance, and color[viii].
    • Protects the cells from degradation: Lutein also protect keratinocytes from UV radiation-induced photoaging, stop ECM degradation by inhibiting MMPs, and decrease lipid peroxidation in the skin[11].
    • Reduces enzymes that degrade collagen: oral photoprotection of healthy human skin can be demonstrated at the level of HO1, ICAM1 and MMP1 gene expression[ix]. Lutein has shown to enhance collagen production, and reducing of MMP1 enzymes expression which are involved in collagen & elastin breakdown in dermal skin layer.

MINERALS

  • Copper in the skin, is involved in the synthesis and stabilization of extracellular matrix skin proteins (collagen & elastin) and angiogenesis[x].
    • Stimulates dermal fibroblasts proliferation[13].
    • Upregulates collagen (types I, II, and V) and elastin fiber components (elastin, fibrillins) production by fibroblasts[13].
    • Serves as a cofactor of LOX (lysyl oxidase enzyme) needed for efficient ECM protein cross-linking[13].
    • Stabilizes the skin ECM once formed, as increased crosslinking of collagen and elastin matrices occurs in a copper dose dependant manner[13].
    • Serves as a cofactor of superoxide dismutase, an antioxidant enzyme present in the skin, important for protection against free radicals[13].
    • Serves as a cofactor of tyrosinase, a melanin biosynthesis essential enzyme responsible for skin and hair pigmentation[13].
  • Silica: Silicon (Si) was suggested to have an important function in the formation and maintenance of connective tissue[xi].
    • Maintains structure of skin layers: Nutritional Si deficiency was found to decrease both the collagen synthesis and the formation of glycosaminoglycans in bone and cartilage[14].
    • It also has a minor role in collagen synthesis and plays a structural role in the cross-linking of glycosaminoglycans in connective tissue[14].
    • Improve the glycosaminoglycan structure in the dermis[14].
    • Deficiencies of silicon led to skeletal deformities[xii].
    • Reduce skin roughness: Skin roughness parameters increased in the placebo group but decreased in the silica supplemented group significantly14. Both skin microrelief and mechanical properties improved[14].
    • Strength & elasticity: On the skin, it is suggested that silicon is important for optimal collagen synthesis, improving skin strength and elasticity[15].
  • Sodium: Humans cannot synthesize Vitamin C. Its intestinal transport occurs via a carrier-mediated Na+ dependent mechanism localized at the brush border membrane. There are two known Na+ -dependent carriers in humans: vitamin C transporter-1 (SVCT1), and SVCT2. Therefore, sodium is necessary for vitamin C utilization[xiii].

HYYALURONIC ACID

The key molecule involved in skin moisture is hyaluronic acid (HA) that has unique capacity in retaining water[xiv]. It is the predominant content of the skin ECM (extra cellular matrix)17. Progressive reduction of the size of the HA polymers in skin as a result of aging has also been reported[17]. Thus, the epidermis loses the principle molecule responsible for binding and retaining water molecules, resulting in loss of skin moisture[17].

  • It has various functions like hydration, lubrication of joints, a space filling capacity, and the framework through which cells migrate[17].
  • Maintains skin moisture content17, [xv].
  • The synthesis of HA increases during tissue injury and wound healing[17,18].
  • HA regulates several aspects of tissue repair, the response to injury of fibroblasts and epithelial cells[17].
  • Helps repair fibroblast cells which produce collagen[17].
  • Hyaluronan-binding proteins are constituents of the extracellular matrix and stabilize its integrity[18].
  • This glycosaminoglycan has protective effects on cartilage[18].

HESPERIDIN

Is a flavonoid with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory activities[xvi]. UV-irradiated photodamaged skin shows reduced collagen synthesis, and increased levels and activity of MMP enzymes (degrades collagen), specifically MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-9. MMPs are suggested to be UV-induced aging factors.[19]

  • Hesperidin inhibits UVB-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines19 & wrinkle formation[19].
  • It inhibits MMP-9 expression and activity[19].
  • Upregulates collagen synthesis.[xvii]
  • The antioxidant effect of hesperidin has been reported to be able to protect cell injury, reduce plasma levels of lipid peroxidation markers, and increase antioxidant enzyme activities[xviii].
  • Hesperidin down-regulates MMP-2 and MMP-9. This effect might be involved in its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, which further inhibited MMP activation and collagen degradation[21].

[i] Patricia de Paz‑Lugo et. al.,“High glycine concentration increases collagen synthesis by articular chondrocytes in vitro: acute glycine deficiency could be an important cause of osteoarthritis” Springer Amino Acids (2018) 50:1357–1365

[ii] David L. Vollmer et. al.,“Enhancing Skin Health: By Oral Administration of Natural Compounds and Minerals with Implications to the Dermal Microbiome”, Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 3059

[iii] Adrian Barbul, “Proline Precursors to Sustain Mammalian Collagen Synthesis”,  The Journal of Nutrition 7th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop J. Nutr. 138: 2021S–2024S, 2008

[iv] Nicholas N. DePhillipo, et. al.,“Efficacy of Vitamin C Supplementation on Collagen Synthesis and Oxidative Stress After Musculoskeletal Injuries A Systematic Review”, The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine

[v]Saood Murad, et. al.,“Collagen Synthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts: Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Its Analogs”, The journal of lnvestigative dermatology, 81:158-162, 1983

[vi] Juliet M. Pullar, et. al., “ The Roles of Vitamin C in Skin Health”, Nutrients 2017, 9, 866

[vii] Richard L. Roberts, et. al., “Lutein and zeaxanthin in eye and skin health, Clinics in Dermatology”, Volume 27, Issue 2, 2009, Pages 195-201, ISSN 0738-081X

[viii] Skylar A. Souyoul et. al., “Nutraceuticals: A Review”, Dermatol Ther (Heidelb) (2018) 8:5–16

[ix] S. Grether-Beck et. al., “Molecular evidence that oral supplementation with lycopene or lutein protects human skin against ultraviolet radiation: results from a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study”, British Journal of Dermatology (2017) 176, pp1231–1240

[x] Gadi Borkow, “Using Copper to Improve the Well-Being of the Skin”, Current Chemical Biology, 2014, Vol. 8, No. 2, 2014 Bentham Science Publishers.

[xi] A. Barel, et. al., “Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on skin, nails and hair in women with photodamaged skin”, Arch Dermatol Res (2005)

[xii] Lidiane Advincula de Araújo, et. al., “Use of silicon for skin and hair care: an approach of chemical forms available and efficacy”, An Bras Dermatol. 2016.

[xiii] Pawel R. Kiela and Fayez K. Ghishan “Physiology of Intestinal Absorption and Secretion”, Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2016 April

[xiv]Eleni Papakonstantinou, et. al., “Hyaluronic acid: A key molecule in skin aging”, Dermato-Endocrinology 4:3, 253–258; July–December 2012; Landes Bioscience

[xv]  J. Necas, et. al.,“Hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan): a review”, Veterinarni Medicina, 53, 2008 (8): 397–411

[xvi] Hee Jeong Lee, et. al., “The flavonoid hesperidin exerts anti-photoaging effect by downregulating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression via mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling pathways”, BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2018)

[xvii] X.-H. Yu, et. al., “The protective effects of Berberine and Hesperidin on inflammatory factor-stimulating cardiac fibroblasts”, European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences

[xviii]Putcharawipa Maneesai, et. al., “Hesperidin Prevents Nitric Oxide Deficiency-Induced Cardiovascular Remodeling in Rats via Suppressing TGF-_1 and MMPs Protein Expression”, Nutrients 2018, 10, 1549

 

 

References

[1] Shrutal Narendra Deshmukh et. al., “Enigmatic insight into collagen”, Published by Wolters Kluwer – Medknow © 2016 Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology

[1] Lodish H, et. al.,“Molecular Cell Biology. The Fibrous Proteins of the Matrix”, Molecular Cell Biology. 4th edition. New York: W. H. Freeman; 2000. Section 22.3

[1]Marlyn Wu, et. al., “Biochemistry, Collagen Synthesis”, StatPearls Publishing LLC 2019,.

[1] Patricia de Paz‑Lugo et. al.,“High glycine concentration increases collagen synthesis by articular chondrocytes in vitro: acute glycine deficiency could be an important cause of osteoarthritis” Springer Amino Acids (2018) 50:1357–1365

[1] David L. Vollmer et. al.,“Enhancing Skin Health: By Oral Administration of Natural Compounds and Minerals with Implications to the Dermal Microbiome”, Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 3059

[1] Adrian Barbul, “Proline Precursors to Sustain Mammalian Collagen Synthesis”,  The Journal of Nutrition 7th Amino Acid Assessment Workshop J. Nutr. 138: 2021S–2024S, 2008

[1] Nicholas N. DePhillipo, et. al.,“Efficacy of Vitamin C Supplementation on Collagen Synthesis and Oxidative Stress After Musculoskeletal Injuries A Systematic Review”, The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine

[1]Saood Murad, et. al.,“Collagen Synthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts: Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Its Analogs”, The journal of lnvestigative dermatology, 81:158-162, 1983

[1] Juliet M. Pullar, et. al., “ The Roles of Vitamin C in Skin Health”, Nutrients 2017, 9, 866

[1] Richard L. Roberts, et. al., “Lutein and zeaxanthin in eye and skin health, Clinics in Dermatology”, Volume 27, Issue 2, 2009, Pages 195-201, ISSN 0738-081X

[1] Skylar A. Souyoul et. al., “Nutraceuticals: A Review”, Dermatol Ther (Heidelb) (2018) 8:5–16

[1] S. Grether-Beck et. al., “Molecular evidence that oral supplementation with lycopene or lutein protects human skin against ultraviolet radiation: results from a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study”, British Journal of Dermatology (2017) 176, pp1231–1240

[1] Gadi Borkow, “Using Copper to Improve the Well-Being of the Skin”, Current Chemical Biology, 2014, Vol. 8, No. 2, 2014 Bentham Science Publishers.

[1] A. Barel, et. al., “Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on skin, nails and hair in women with photodamaged skin”, Arch Dermatol Res (2005)

[1] Lidiane Advincula de Araújo, et. al., “Use of silicon for skin and hair care: an approach of chemical forms available and efficacy”, An Bras Dermatol. 2016.

[1] Pawel R. Kiela and Fayez K. Ghishan “Physiology of Intestinal Absorption and Secretion”, Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2016 April

[1]Eleni Papakonstantinou, et. al., “Hyaluronic acid: A key molecule in skin aging”, Dermato-Endocrinology 4:3, 253–258; July–December 2012; Landes Bioscience

[1]  J. Necas, et. al.,“Hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan): a review”, Veterinarni Medicina, 53, 2008 (8): 397–411

[1] Hee Jeong Lee, et. al., “The flavonoid hesperidin exerts anti-photoaging effect by downregulating matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression via mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling pathways”, BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2018)

[1] X.-H. Yu, et. al., “The protective effects of Berberine and Hesperidin on inflammatory factor-stimulating cardiac fibroblasts”, European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences

[1]Putcharawipa Maneesai, et. al., “Hesperidin Prevents Nitric Oxide Deficiency-Induced Cardiovascular Remodeling in Rats via Suppressing TGF-_1 and MMPs Protein Expression”, Nutrients 2018, 10, 1549

Additional information

Weight N/A
Dimensions N/A
Servings

10 Indivdiual Sachets, 45 Servings

What is Collagen?

Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III[i] 

Functions & Distribution in the Body:  

There are at least 16 types of collagen, but 80 – 90 percent of the collagen in the body consists of types I, II, and III[ii]: 

TYPE I COLLAGENMost abundant collagen. Type I collagen fibrils are used as the reinforcing rods in construction of bone[2]. Abundantly found in skin, bone dentin cementum, tendons, ligaments and most connective tissue. Provide tensile strength to connective tissues1. 

TYPE II COLLAGEN – Is the major collagen in cartilage. Impart a strength and compressibility to the matrix and allow it to resist large deformations in shape. This property allows joints to absorb shocks2. Present in Cartilage, vitreous humor, intervertebral disk. Provides tensile strength to connective tissue1 

TYPE III COLLAGEN – Abundant in elastic tissue. Also found in embryonic connective tissue, pulp, skin, blood vessels, and lymphoid tissue. Provides tensile strength to connective tissue1 

Biosynthesis

Intracellular 

  • After Transcription of mRNA in the nucleus and translation where the Alpha-chain is formed which incorporates the amino acids Glycine-Proline-lysine, it is referred to as pre-pro-polypeptide chain; this chain then travels to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for post-translational modification.  
  • In the ER, the pre-pro-polypeptide undergoes post-translational processing where three major modifications are made to the pre-pro-polypeptide for it to become pro-collagen.  
  1. The signal peptide on the N-terminal is removed 
  1. The lysine and proline residues get additional hydroxyl groups added to them via hydroxylase enzymes which require vitamin C as a cofactor 
  1. Glycosylation of the selected hydroxyl groups on lysine with galactose and glucose b 
  • Three of the hydroxylated and glycosylated pro-alpha-chains assemble by twisting into a triple helix by zipper-like folding. The triple helix configuration is 3 left-handed helices twisted into a right-handed coil 
  • Now the pro-collagen molecule is ready to move to the Golgi apparatus for final modifications and assembled to enter the extracellular space 

Extracellular 

Propeptide cleavage  

  • Enzymes known as collagen peptidases preform propeptide cleavage and remove the ends of the procollagen molecule and the molecule becomes tropocollagen 

Collagen Fibril Assembly  

  • Lysyl oxidase a copper-dependent enzyme acts on lysine and hydroxylysines, and covalent bonding between tropocollagen molecules form a collagen fibril 

Why is a Collagen Builder necessary?

With regards to aging, the deposition of collagen (and elastin) decreases with chronological-aging and particularly with photo-aging (exposure to the sun). In addition, it can be broken down by hydrolyzing proteins (concentration of which increases with age & exposure to sun) such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which results in dermal damage and undesirable skin wrinkles4. Collagenase hydrolyzes both Type I and Type III collagen1. Thus, collagen builder is essential to boost the collagen production in order to achieve firmer skin, reduce wrinkles & slow down aging, increase shock absorbency of joints, and add structure & strength to bones and connective tissues in various locations of the body. 

Our Formulation

Synthesizers 

  • Amino acids Blend (Gly-Orn-Lys): ornithine is the precursor of proline and also supports collagen generation. Gly-Pro-Lys are involved in the formation of the pre-pro-polypeptide chain. Basically these amino acids are necessary for the primary initiation of collagen synthesis. 
  • Sodium: Sodium Dependent Vitamin C Transporter is responsible for vitamin C uptake in the human body. 
  • Vitamin C: the hydroxylase enzyme that adds a hydroxyl group to the proline and lysine molecule of the polypeptide chain requires Vitamin C as Cofator. 
  • Copper: the enzyme responsible for assembling the collagen fibrils is copper dependent. 

Plant-Based Protectors: 

  • Lutein: major function of lutein is to inactivate the collagenase enzymes that degrade collagen. It is also a more potent natural antioxidant that increases the rate of collagen synthesis. It also possesses photoprotective activities. 
  • Hesperidin: has an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory activity. It inhibits UV-induced inflammation & wrinkle formation. It also inhibits activity and expression of collagen degrading enzymes and upregulates collagen synthesis. It is a natural antioxidant. 

Maintenance & Hydration: 

  • Hyaluronic Acid: prevents dehydration of the dermis. It helps to repair fibroblast cells which produce collagen. Thus Hyaluronic acid aids in collagen synthesis and prevents degradation of the dermis layer maintaining the integrity of the skin. 
  • Organic Bamboo Extract: it is a source of the mineral silica. It is important for optimal collagen synthesis and plays a structural role in the cross-linking of glycosaminoglycans in connective tissue improving skin strength and elasticity. 

Why Vegan?

No Hooves, No Horns and No Hides 

Collagen hydrolysate comes from animal sources & has 33% glycine residues (25% of its mass), so 10 g of hydrolysate (the daily dose used) means 2.5 g of glycine, which alone is insufficient for the metabolic needs[4] 

  • On the other hand, gelatin or collagen hydrolysates are not advantageous as proline or lysine sources because of their hydroxylated forms, which mean about 30-50% of these amino acid residues are useless for reutilization[4] 
  • Collagen hydrolysates are obtained from animals. 
  • Collagen hydrolysate needs to be broken down into amino acids which then the body uses for collagen generation, thus it makes more sense to provide the body with necessary amino acids directly. 

Unived’s Vegan Collagen Builder contains everything that is essential to boost the collagen generating pathway and to protect and maintain the collagen that is produced. It contains enough natural antioxidants to fight free radical damage and protect the cells & specific amino acids in required amounts to aid synthesis. Various products available make us believe that more is better thus, are loaded with different antioxidant ingredients with little or no amino acid; however our Vegan Collagen Builder is designed to meet the requirement with specific essential ingredients in adequate dosages. 

FAQ's

Who should consume this Vegan Collagen Builder? 

Our Vegan Collagen Builder can be consumed by anyone looking to improve their skin, hair, bone, and tissue health. This could be healthy adults, ageing adults, athletes, and even young adults looking for a healthy supplement. It is especially important for those on a vegetarian or vegan diet.

How is Unived’s Vegan Collagen Builder different from other Plant Based Collagen Builder products? 

We find that most other plant based collagen builder products are packed with a lot of plant & fruit powders & extracts  – which may be healthy, but which do not have a specific role to play in collagen synthesis. They are also packed with a large amount of biotin, a lot of anti-oxidants, and with very little, or, in most cases, zero amino acids. They use attractive herbs & plants, to make the product look healthy, but in truth these products are not scientifically formulated and are more gimmicky products.

Amino acids are the basic ingredients for collagen synthesis. Along with these, you require certain other ingredients for hydration and repair. We focus on giving you the right ingredients, in the required quantity. Our product is formulated to enhance natural collagen generation, and also to help protect, maintain, and hydrate the dermis layer in which collagen is present.

Is this an anti-aging product? 

Aging is a natural phenomenon and everyone ages with time. Our formulation contains ingredients that may fight various factors that can cause early signs of aging. It can help make your skin appear healthier, plum, firm, and protect from photo-damage. 

Is this product only for beauty and skin? 

No, in addition to collagen of skin this product can be used to increase strength of connective tissues, bones, and increase shock absorbency of joints as collagen has various functions in the body and is found in almost all our tissues.

Suggested Use

Adults consume 1 sachet or 1 scoop daily with 150-200ml of water on a light stomach, either in the morning or 30 mins prior to bed time.

For best results, one should use the product for at least 60-90 days.

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